Artist Christo Javacheff, Who Wrapped Berlin's Reichstag And NYC Central Park's The Gates, Dies At 84

Artist Christo Javacheff, Who Wrapped Berlin’s Reichstag And NYC Central Park’s The Gates, Dies At 84 – Christo Vladimirov Javacheff, best known as Christo, famous for large-scale installations and wrapping in fabric famous landmarks such as “The Pont Neuf,” has died Sunday at his home.

 

Artist Christo Javacheff, Who Wrapped Berlin’s Reichstag And NYC Central Park’s The Gates, Dies At 84 | Christo Cause Of Death:

 

Christo, who is world famous for monumental installations, covering huge objects in miles of fabric and rope, died on Sunday (May 31) at his home in New York City at age of 84.

Christo Vladimirov Javacheff passed away of natural causes on Sunday, according to a statement made on the artist’s official Twitter and Facebook accounts.

“Christo lived his life to the fullest, not only dreaming up what seemed impossible but realizing it,” his office said in a statement. “Christo and Jeanne-Claude’s artwork brought people together in shared experiences across the globe, and their work lives on in our hearts and memories.”

Christo, who always worked with his wife Jeanne-Claude Denat de Guillebon until her death in 2009, famously covered the Reichstag in Berlin and the Pont-Neuf in Paris with reams of cloth.

Christo Javacheff was born on June 13, 1935 in Gabrovo, Bulgaria as the second of three sons to Tzveta Dimitrov and Vladimir Javacheff, who worked at a textile manufacturer.

Christo studied at the Fine Arts Academy in Sofia before moving to Prague in 1957, then Vienna, then to Geneva, Switzerland. In 1958, Christo went to Paris, where he met his future wife and also life partner in the creation of monumental environmental works of art, Jeanne-Claude Denat de Guillebon, when he was commissioned to paint a portrait of her mother, Précilda de Guillebon.

 

Christo And Jeanne-Claude, Bulgarian-Born Artist Christo, Wrapped And Monumental Outdoor Projects, Died Of Natural Causes

Christo And Jeanne-Claude, Bulgarian-Born Artist Christo, Wrapped And Monumental Outdoor Projects, Died Of Natural Causes

 

Christo And Jeanne-Claude | Bulgarian-Born Artist Christo, Wrapped And Monumental Outdoor Projects, Died Of Natural Causes:

 

Christo was already wrapping smaller found objects, like cars and furniture, but after he met Jeanne-Claude, their scale broadened.

Jeanne-Claude gave birth her and Christo’s son, Cyril, on May 11, 1960.

In 1961, the couple covered barrels at the port of Cologne, their first collaboration.

In 1962, the duo tackled their first monumental project, Rideau de Fer (Iron Curtain).

At the end of 1969, Christo and Jeanne-Claude “Wrapped Coast, Little Bay,” in Sydney, Australia.

With Wrapped Walk Ways Jeanne-Claude and Christo covered 4.5 km (2.8 mi) of footpaths in Loose Park, a park in Kansas City, Missouri.

Christo and Jeanne-Claude surrounded eleven islands in Miami’s Biscayne Bay with 603,850 m2 (6,499,800 sq ft) of pink polypropylene floating fabric (1980–83).

After 32 years of planning and preparation work, Christo and Jeanne-Claude wrapped 178 trees in the Beyeler Foundation’s “Berower Park” in the north-eastern part of Basel, in 1998.

Other works included — “Valley Curtain” in Colorado (1970–72), “Running Fence” in California (1972–76), “The Umbrellas” in Japan and California (1984–91) and “The Gates” in New York’s Central Park (1979–2005), “The Floating Piers at Italy’s Lake Iseo” (2014–16).

Jeanne-Claude died in 2009 at age 74 from complications of a brain aneurysm.

Following the passing of Denat de Guillebon, Christo went on to work alone. In 2016, the artist created “The Floating Piers,” an installation consisting of bright yellow fabric floating on Lake Iseo in Italy; and in 2018, Christo made his U.K. debut with the floating “London Mastaba” at the Serpentine Lake in Hyde Park.

Christo and Jeanne-Claude’s work will also be celebrated in Paris with a major exhibition at the Centre Georges Pompidou from July 1–October 19, 2020.

“I wrapped several road signs. I particularly liked the formal geometry, triangle or circle, of these objects. This work involves an object originally intended to give you information or instructions. By doing something similar to what is often done on the highway, that is, covering the sign with fabric, the meaning of that road sign is negated,” said Christo.

 

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